Ubuntu and Google Chrome

The last few days, I’ve been repeatedly getting the following when I do an apt-get update on my Ubuntu Desktop (14.04, if that matters).

W: Failed to fetch http://dl.google.com/linux/chrome/deb/dists/stable/Release  Unable to find expected entry 'main/binary-i386/Packages' in Release file (Wrong sources.list entry or malformed file)
 
E: Some index files failed to download. They have been ignored, or old ones used instead.

Some light reading and specifically this post on OMGUbuntu, coupled with some instructions in the comments section, led me to the following solution which works for now.
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Grub

It used to be easy to manage grub. Simple changes to /boot/grub/menu.lst you were a-for-away. If you run a dual-boot environment (e.g, Ubuntu and Windows) and you want to change your Grub config to boot to a specific OS these days however (with the advent of newer versions of Grub) there are different steps to follow.

In this example, I’m running Windows 7 and Ubuntu 14.04 on the same machine in a dual-boot configuration. I need Windows to be the default menu entry.

Step 1: Find the menuentry for the operating system you want to make the default boot option

hendri@mercury:~$ grep 'menuentry ' /boot/grub/grub.cfg
 
menuentry 'Ubuntu' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-simple-531984cc-cdb4-4d22-9e98-2914966fd84e' {
        menuentry 'Ubuntu, with Linux 3.16.0-30-generic' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-3.16.0-30-generic-advanced-531984cc-cdb4-4d22-9e98-2914966fd84e' {
        menuentry 'Ubuntu, with Linux 3.16.0-30-generic (recovery mode)' --class ubuntu --class gnu-linux --class gnu --class os $menuentry_id_option 'gnulinux-3.16.0-30-generic-recovery-531984cc-cdb4-4d22-9e98-2914966fd84e' {
menuentry 'Memory test (memtest86+)' {
menuentry 'Memory test (memtest86+, serial console 115200)' {
menuentry 'Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda1)' --class windows --class os $menuentry_id_option 'osprober-chain-A4AE5922AE58EE74' {
    menuentry "Memory Tester (memtest86+)" --class memtest86 --class gnu --class tool {

In the above output, copy/record the Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda1) text.

Step 2: Edit /etc/default/grub using your preferred editor and make GRUB_DEFAULT the text above

GRUB_DEFAULT="Windows 7 (loader) (on /dev/sda1)"
 
#save and exit

Step 3: Update grub

hendri@mercury:~$ sudo update-grub

That’s it. You should now have your Windows host boot by default

This guide is loosely based on the this post but I was unable to complete the installation because of the following error:

hendri@techedemic: /var/tmp/ixgbe-4.1.2/src $ dmesg
......snipped......
[12270.405508] ixgbe: Unknown symbol vxlan_get_rx_port (err 0)
[12428.182904] ixgbe: Unknown symbol vxlan_get_rx_port (err 0)
[13448.131090] ixgbe: Unknown symbol vxlan_get_rx_port (err 0)
[18947.596474] ixgbe: Unknown symbol vxlan_get_rx_port (err 0)
[18975.603555] ixgbe: Unknown symbol vxlan_get_rx_port (err 0)
......snipped......

So, here follows the same guide, but with the missing steps I needed to complete the installation.
As a reference, I was running Kernel 3.13.0-20 before this.
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Ubuntu text boot

First things first – remember, always back up important system files before editing!

If you want to view the tradional kernel message output when booting into Ubuntu, you can do it as follows:

Edit /etc/default/grub and edit the following line:

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT="quiet splash"

Change it to:
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apt-get logo

More often than not, I have to deploy a system which will not have access to the internet or an apt-proxy/apt-cacher installations somewhere. This means I cannot install new packages which might be required at a later stage.

I’ll use an example install of postgresql to explain how you can get all the required files (specifically for your machine) and deploy it on your server.
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Enter your Ubuntu credentials

This is an update of a previous post, found here. I’ve added a section to the bottom which explains how you can connect to the same session each time.

If you need to connect to a Linux machine, and in the scope of this guide, Ubuntu 14.04 (I’m sure this guide should be fine for earlier versions as well), then your options include:

  • Pure and simple SSH – The admin’s super tool! (just install openssh-server – works every time!)
  • VNC – I don’t like this method because you need to install software on your client AND server
  • XRDP – This still involves VNC to some degree but you can use the normal Windows Remote Desktop Client

The latter is the one I’ll guide you through here. Continue reading

Enter your Ubuntu credentials

Please see Connect via RDP to Ubuntu 14.04 using XRDP for an updated version of this post.

If you need to connect to a Linux machine, and in the scope of this guide, Ubuntu 13.10 (I’m sure this guide should be fine for earlier versions as well), then your options include:

  • Pure and simple SSH – The admin’s super tool! (just install openssh-server – works every time!)
  • VNC – I don’t like this method because you need to install software on your client AND server
  • XRDP – This still involves VNC to some degree but you can use the normal Windows Remote Desktop Client

The latter is the one I’ll guide you through here. Continue reading

Speedtest.net is the de facto internet link speed testing tool out there. Some people might argue that it is not accurate, but it’s still the most popular tool of it’s kind out there.

For us geeky individuals that have only the command line (cli) available to us in Linux but still want to test our link speed to the internet, there is a solution. speedtest-cli

To use, do the following (Tested in Ubuntu)
Step 1: Install GIT (git-core)

user@techedemic:~$ sudo apt-get install git-core

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